Retractable Fabric Banner Stands, Types of Files For Printing, and CMYK vs RGB Color Spectrums

Question: I need to order some pull up or roll up banners. What sizes are available and what advice you could give me for the print file design and file type?”

Answer: There are several sizes available, from table top roll up banners to very large back wall retractable banners. Horizontal sizes range from 22 inches to 60 inches to heights of 36 inches to over 10 feet. Not all these combinations, of course, are available together. For instance, you probably won’t be able to find a 22 inch wide roll up banner that is over 10 feet tall for stability reasons.

One of the most popular sizes is the 85 centimeter by 200 centimeter, or approximately 33.5 inches by 79 inches. Another popular larger size is approximately 91.5 centimeters by 233.5 centimeters, or 36 inches wide by 92 inches tall. Custom sizes are also available, but costly and slower to get.

There are also various materials that you can have the banner portion of the stand made from such as lightweight “stay flat” vinyl (normal vinyl will tend to have some edge curl), bonded and laminated paper products, or dye sublimated polyester fabric banner material, which is our favorite for its continuous tone print quality – like a photographic print.

Regarding your print file, it should be prepared with a minimum half an inch bleed edge (for instance, if you have a photographic background or even a light-colored background, it should “bleed” outside the actual banner size half an inch), and text, logos, or other design elements should be a minimum of one inch inside the banner edge.

The file can be saved at 150 dpi full-sized or 300 dpi at half-sized, though we recommend a full-sized banner file at the former size. Also, if you’re working in Illustrator or Photoshop, that you flatten your files so as not to have any elements drop on in the print file. Most printing companies can print good files such as.pdf,.ai, and.eps files -.jpg files can also print OK if you follow the above specifications.

Hope this helped. Anyway, you can find more about retractable and pull up banner stands in this page – http://www.visigraph.com/fabric-vinyl-cloth-banners/banner-and-stands/

Question: Should I send an artwork in RGB or CMYK for printing?

Answer: First, let me define what those two acronyms stand for and what each is used for.

RGB stands for the Red-Green-Blue color spectrum, and is what your computer monitor and your television use to create the color that you see in both places. Recently, one major computer company came out with a CMYK monitor, so this may begin to change in the future, but for now, most digital images you see use the RGB color spectrum.

CMYK stands for Cyan-Magenta-Yellow-Black, and is the basis of colors used for printing and everything else, for the most part, that is not digital or electronic. When you have business cards printed, or decals, or signs, or banners, or menus or any other printed advertising piece, you will need to submit your file(s) to the printer in a CMYK format, because no printer that we’re aware of prints in the RGB color spectrum.

The rub with having these two common color spectrums used in the printing industry is that you view most print files in RGB, and then they get printed in CMYK. So, you design something on your computer that looks good, color-wise, to you on your computer’s monitor, and convert it to CMYK, and send it out to a printer, and yuck! you get your cards back and the color is all wrong. What happened? It looked great on your monitor!

Here’s what happened. Your monitor, which most likely is not calibrated to the CMYK color spectrum, simply did what it’s factory preset colors told it to do. Your printer, though, should have asked you if you needed a specific color, and explained to you that “red” means one thing to your computer’s monitor, and could mean something entirely different to an actual printing machine whose print spectrum is calibrated to the CMYK color spectrum.

The way to get around this, without buying a spectrometer and calibrating your computer’s RGB to be roughly equal to the CMYK spectrum is to find Pantone Matching System® colors (known more commonly as PMS colors), is to view a PMS color fan and choose the specific color you’d like your printer to use. Most printers have one or several of these in their office or shop, and if you’re dealing with a company from a long distance, there are ways to view these fans without spending the high cost to purchase them.

Television Aims to Educate and Inform Viewers

Television signals were originally transmitted exclusively via land-based transmitters. Television genres include a broad range of programming types that entertain, inform, and educate viewers. Television genres that aim to educate and inform viewers include educational shows, DIY programs on cooking, gardening, or home renovation, history shows, performing arts programs, and documentaries. Television service providers also offer video on demand, a set of programs which could be watched at any time.

Dtv

DTV is a new type of broadcasting technology that will transform television as we now know it. DTV technology will allow broadcasters to offer television with movie-quality picture and CD-quality sound, along with a variety of other enhancements. DTV technology can also be used to transmit large amounts of other data into the home, which may be accessible by using your computer or television set. DTV allows the same number of stations to broadcast using fewer total channels (less of the broadcast spectrum) which will free up scarce and valuable spectrum for public safety and new wireless services. DTV technology can also be used to provide interactive video and data services that are not possible with “analog” technology. DTV allows a number of new and better services. DTV is a more flexible and efficient technology than the current analog system. DTV can provide interactive video and data services that are not possible with “analog” technology. DTV provides viewers with sharper images, better sound, and more viewing options than have ever been available over the air.

Broadcast

A television system may be made up of multiple components, so a screen which lacks an internal tuner to receive the broadcast signals is called a monitor rather than a television. A television may be built to receive different broadcast or video formats, such as high-definition television (HDTV). The elements of a simple broadcast television system are:An image source. An antenna coupled to the output of the transmitter for broadcasting the encoded signals. An antenna to receive the broadcast signals. A receiver (also called a tuner), which decodes the picture and sound information from the broadcast signals, and whose input is coupled to the antenna. A typical NTSC broadcast signal’s visible portion has an equivalent resolution of about 640×480 pixels. It actually could be slightly higher than that, but the vertical blanking interval (VBI), allows other signals to be carried along with the broadcast. Higher frequencies behave more like light and do not penetrate buildings or travel around obstructions well enough to be used in a conventional broadcast TV system, so they are generally only used for MMDS and satellite television, which uses frequencies from 2 to 12 GHz.

Television and Young People (TVYP) is the UK’s leading forum for young people aspiring to work in television. Television shows are available in the US and UK only, and video availability varies by country. Television preservation is a relatively new field.

The Digital Television Revolution

The 2012 London Olympics really brought home to me just what a massive technological jump in digital media has occurred during the last few years. There has been significant advances in digital compression and transmission.

This year, in addition to high definition broadcast, which made its appearance in the 2008 Beijing games, 3D television was also added to the line up, offering more channels and choices. With analogue television broadcast almost becoming extinct, digital televisions promise of delivering more for less has become a reality. Now, how did we arrive at this point and what does the future hold for digital multimedia?

Prior to the digital switchover, analogue television was resource hungry in terms of the amount of bandwidth required to carry a single channel. This is typically between 6 – 8 MHz depending on the type of video standard being used. This limited the number of channels which could be transmitted, since there is a finite amount of spectrum that must be shared with other services such as mobile, radio and two way communications.

What the digital standards of ATSC (North America) and DVB (Rest of the World) provided was the ability to reuse the existing analogue spectrum more efficiently. This meant a typical 8 MHz carrier used for analogue broadcast could be converted to DVB-T (Digital Video – Terrestrial) making it possible to carry 9 standard definition channels or 3 HD channels plus one SD channel for the same amount of bandwidth.

It would have required in excess of 70 MHz of frequency spectrum to achieve this with the old analogue standard. In addition to squeezing more channels into less space, digital television is much clearer and doesn’t suffer from ghosting or other artifacts which troubled analogue systems. Being digital also allows other features like improved digital sound, electronic program guide and subtitle support to be included.

Televisions are sold with the digital decoder integrated and older televisions can use a separate set top box. As technology advances, we will also see improvements in the compression techniques used, which means even more content for digital media, already this has enabled 3D broadcasts for some events such as the Olympics.

The Future

Eventually as fibre to the home is deployed worldwide, the all IP enabled set top box will replace the DVB standard, since the IP set top box has a distinct advantage over digital broadcast technologies, specifically multicast join requests. Unlike DVB-T or DVB-S, IP multicast allows the receiver to send a join message to the network for the desired channel then if the request is successful the broadcast is routed to the receiver, only the bandwidth for the requested channel is used. With the DVB standard, all available channels are being broadcast simultaneously, and the channel count is limited by the finite amount of channel bandwidth regardless of the compression techniques being used.

The IP set top box can support both selective multicast (one to many) and on demand unicast (one to one) broadcast, this allows for virtually unlimited amount of content. However, unlike DVB, IP set top boxes have to worry about latency and QOS, since there is traffic contention with both residential broadband and IP Telephony. A poorly implemented IPTV deployment can behave like analogue television in an over subscribed service provider network, unless the correct traffic management is in place.

High Definition

Today HD is regarded as premium content by most operators and is charged at a higher rate than SD (Standard Definition). However, over time this will change as people upgrade their televisions to HD models. Today there are two standards for digital HD broadcast, 720p and 1080i. The ‘p’ means progressive and the ‘i’ means interlaced. In 720p broadcast, the picture is made of 720 horizontal scan lines and a vertical resolution of 1280 pixels, which has the advantage that one frame represents a complete image.

In 1080i broadcast, the picture is made from two 540 horizontal scan images which when combined make 1080 lines. The vertical resolution becomes 1920 pixels. Most modern televisions support playback of 1080p, which is definitely more desirable than 1080i especially in fast moving sequences where motion blur can be experienced. However, on modern televisions the difference is barely discernible.

Initially the public uptake of HD was slow, the receivers were expensive and the available content was limited. HD television has really been an evolution rather than a revolutionary change for most of us and this is also true of digital television in general. As digital switchover continues worldwide and consumers replace their televisions, digital will become the new standard. However, it is unfortunate that technology won’t help to improve the content.